Close

Sun Subscriber Website Login






Please wait....
 
News Story
Updated: 05/09/2013 08:01:25AM

Mulberries
are a native fruit

Share this story:


GardGate050913A

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY AL SMOKE

Red mulberry (Morus rubra) is native nearly throughout Florida. Small greenish white flowers resemble the fruits, which develop shortly after flowering. Fruits are similar in appearance to blackberries; red to dark purple 1 and 2 in. long.

GardGate050913B

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY AL SMOKE

Mulberry trees may reach heights of 15 to 70 feet, growing larger in its northern ranges. The trunk is usually short and the upright tree develops a spreading crown that may take on a weeping form as the tree matures.

By KAREN SMOKE

Text Size:


If plants could have inferiority complexes, mulberry probably would. Mulberries are often ignored or detested because the fruit can leave a mess on sidewalks, or droppings from birds who consume the fruits may stain laundry on clotheslines. But wildlife and some people appreciate this undervalued fruit.

The fruit is delicious and deserves to be planted more widely. Most references to mulberry recommend it as a plant for attracting wildlife, so even if you don’t relish the fruits, consider planting a mulberry tree for wildlife. Berries are chiefly eaten by birds, and it’s not uncommon for a flock of birds to strip a tree in a few hours. However, mammals such as squirrels, opossums and raccoons also relish these sweet berries. Mulberry trees were once planted widely as a farmyard tree to provide supplemental feed for chickens and hogs.

You are currently not logged in
By logging in you can see the full story.

Subscribe to 
							the E-Edition
Get the Sun Delivered


ADVERTISEMENT